thefinalimage:

The “Best Picture” Losers: A Final Image Montage (with years)

86 “Best Picture” runnerups, losers, (or should’ve won) and the year they lost 

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[Film titles here]

(Source: pastpicturerewind)

220 notes

Cut a chrysalis open, and you will find a rotting caterpillar. What you will never find is that mythical creature, half caterpillar, half butterfly, a fit emblem of the human soul, for those whose cast of mind leads them to seek such emblems. No, the process of transformation consists almost entirely of decay.
Pat Barker, Regeneration (via blue-voids)

(Source: awritersruminations)

3,475 notes

Two February’s ago, all I wanted to do was sleep. I was anchored to my bed with the sadness I was letting myself drown in. Now, I daydream about surviving on 3 hours of sleep, I dread going to bed, I keep my eyes open as long as I can. My heart sinks when the sun sets, I crave daylight; I’ve fallen in love with being alive.
Madisen Kuhn, January 18, 2014 journal entry (via rauchwolken)

(Source: praises)

33,624 notes

cinephilearchive:

“All we need is some forest and hills.” Eric Burritt shared a great vintage article on how 22 years old Stanley Kubrick planned to make his first feature film, ‘Fear and Desire.’

If you were nineteen and starting out again, would you go to film school?
The best education in film is to make one. I would advise any neophyte director to try to make a film by himself. A three-minute short will teach him a lot. I know that all the things I did at the beginning were, in microcosm, the things I’m doing now as a director and producer. There are a lot of noncreative aspects to filmmaking which have to be overcome, and you will experience them all when you make even the simplest film: business, organization, taxes, etc., etc. It is rare to be able to have an uncluttered, artistic environment when you make a film, and being able to accept this is essential. The point to stress is that anyone seriously interested in making a film should find as much money as he can as quickly as he can and go out and do it. And this is no longer as difficult as it once was. When I began making movies as an independent in the early 1950s I received a fair amount of publicity because I was something of a freak in an industry dominated by a handful of huge studios. Everyone was amazed that it could be done at all. But anyone can make a movie who has a little knowledge of cameras and tape recorders, a lot of ambition and — hopefully — talent. It’s gotten down to the pencil and paper level. We’re really on the threshold of a revolutionary new era in film. —Stanley Kubrick

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150 notes

There is poetry as soon as we realize that we possess nothing.
John Cage (via likeafieldmouse)

1,307 notes

I didn’t become obsessed with music because I saw live shows that blew me away. I became obsessed with music because I was exploring my parents’ record collection, and spending hours in friends’ bedrooms listening to music. I like the imaginary space of the album. More than anything, I feel very at ease with the internet for music, because that’s an imaginary space, not a physical space. I remember when people first started having Napster and playing MP3s, and in some ways, I was like, This is perfect. This is what we always wanted. Just to be able to play each other music, hang out in somebody’s bedroom, just, like, chill. So now the fact that music does exist in a nonphysical space, I love it. That’s not to say I don’t appreciate a beautiful venue or a historic recording studio, but that’s very secondary to me. I like the ideas of music and the concepts. I’m glad the tail end of my childhood overlapped with the internet era of music, because I can still feel nostalgic for the early parts of the internet era of music. It’s not such a clean break. So yes, the nonphysical space.
Ezra Koenig for New York Magazine (March 24, 2014)

(Source: spamcans)

1,997 notes